Monday Ticketed Sessions 8:00 – 9:30 a.m.

Janine Firmender
Mathematical Processes to Develop & Uncover Mathematical Talent
Both the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics and more recently the Indiana College and Career Ready Standards specify that mathematical processes are a necessary component of mathematics education for all students. Additionally, recommendations from the field of gifted education encourage teachers to engage students as the practicing professionals in a field, in the case of this session, mathematicians. Throughout this session we will explore and analyze mathematical tasks to examine how the mathematical processes can be integrated in instruction for mathematically talented students.  Specifically, we will discuss the integration of processes such as problem solving, reasoning about mathematics, communicating about and constructing arguments in mathematics, and using mathematical representations.
Audience: Elementary, middle grades may benefit as well
Interactive Level: informational lecture; participants will work on mathematical tasks; sharing and discussion among participants

Isabelle Crowder and Elizabeth Connell-Lewis
Understanding and Nurturing Creative Behaviors in the Classroom Through Explorations of Books, Films and Media
Highly creative children can be especially challenging in the classroom. They are often described as bizarre, distracted, impulsive, non-conforming, and spacey. They have difficulty following directions and completing assignments on time. Many creative children are frustrated with short class periods for the completion of projects and they have difficulty working in groups. Teachers may unwittingly squelch the creative behaviors of their students in an effort to manage them or help them conform to the system. Many times, creative strengths such as fluency, flexibility, originality, abstract thinking and a tolerance for ambiguity are a child’s greatest assets and these are traits that less creative individuals would love to possess. We need to protect and nurture these valuable natural resources so that they might be applied in various ways to solve the challenges of the future. This session will provide a brief overview of various creative behaviors and characteristics and the challenges that these may present in the classroom. The presenters will emphasize the importance of nurturing these behaviors, rather than squelching them as we develop future scientists, inventors, leaders, and problem-solvers of the future. Video clips and passages from books will be shared to illustrate how books, films and media may be used to help students and teachers to better appreciate creative behaviors and the importance of nurturing and developing those creative skills in children of all ages. Participants will leave with a list of books, films and other resources that may be shared with children at different levels and in different content areas as well as suggestions for lessons and activities for use in the regular classroom or pull-out setting. Audience: K-8
Interactive Level: Attendees will participate in some small group activities and discussion

Margaret Easom Hines
Using the 4 P’s of Creativity to Add “Zing” to Your Classroom
With increasing globalization and development in the 21st century comes the necessity to think creatively and innovatively. While it is clear that creativity is essential to success in today’s schools and workplaces, the demand to enhance creative skills is both nebulous and intimidating. While teaching for creativity sounds exhilarating, is there really time to enhance creative thinking skills while also delivering appropriate content? This presentation discusses the importance of cultivating a creative mindset in the classroom, through what has been termed as the Four “P’s” of Creativity: person, process, product and press (Rhodes, 1961). This session will provide practical illustrations concerning how teachers can view existing classroom materials through the lens of creative teaching. Lessons and experiences that example how to simultaneously deliver content and creativity, creating a cocktail of engaging learning opportunities for students at all levels, will be shared.
Audience: All levels
Interactive Level: Participants will practice creative strategies.

Penny Kolloff
More Bang for the Books: Literature, Standards, and the Gifted Learner
The intent of state standards is to increase complexity, rigor, and quality for all learners. The English/Language Arts reading standards identify examples of literature and informational text aligned with grade levels. Those who work with gifted learners note, however, that many titles and grade levels in lists of suggested materials do not provide advanced learners with sufficient challenge beyond the standard curriculum. This session will explore reading curriculum for high ability learners in light of recent standards. The presenter will focus on literature selection, recognizing that older titles, including classic literature, often provide more complex and rewarding literary experiences for gifted learners. The session will suggest criteria and a process for selecting literature and informational material, including specific examples of titles and resources particularly suited to academically talented learners in the elementary and middle school grades.
Audience: Teachers, Coordinators, Administrators, K-8
Interactive Level: Presentation and conversation

Tracy Inman *Session Full - No Seats Available*
Survival Skills for the Differentiated Classroom
Children thrive in an appropriately differentiated learning environment; therefore, it’s vital that educators learn survival skills, especially when differentiating for advanced students, so the educators thrive as well. From establishing and managing a classroom conducive to effective differentiation to instructional dimensions and learner outcomes, these survival strategies benefit both students and teachers.
Audience: All educators and administrators
Interactive Level: Attendees participate in multiple active learning experiences including carousel, think-pair-share, small group tasks, etc.

Shelagh Gallagher
Problem-Based Learning: Using the Power of Story to Drive the Curriculum
In Problem-Based Learning students find themselves transported into the most intriguing type of story—a mystery. The PBL story transports students into an adventure, based on real-world situations, where they learn how to become independent thinkers and self-directed collaborators. This introduction to PBL will focus on the fundamentals, including the ill-structured problem, the problem’s storyline, the student stakeholder role and the teacher-as-coach. Through demonstration and discussion, research, and practical experience you will see how a carefully constructed PBL problem uses the allure of a story to initiate self-directed learning while still achieving content requirements.
Audience: Teachers, primarily 1-8 but high school welcome; administrators, coordinators
Interactive Level: Audience will engage in a simulation, discuss, respond to questions, and analyze activities.

Virginia Burney, Kristie Speirs Neumeister, and Lisa Novotney
Indiana High Ability Language Arts Units 2-5 (Phase II)
The Indiana High Ability Language Arts Units, Phase II, developed by the Indiana Department of Education provide new model units to help educators successfully implement the ELA standards for high ability learners. If you’re looking for a new IHALA unit to use in your classroom, or just want to hear more about these free resources, this session is for you. An overview of the unit project and the new models and strategies included in them will kick off the workshop. Then, participants will meet with the grade level author for a closer look at the unit concept, its readings, and the resources that are included in the lessons. You must specify a grade level upon registration.
Audience: Teachers, coordinators, administrators Grades 2-5
Interactive Level: Presentation and discussion/participation

Zachary Herrmann
Easy Entry into Project Based Learning
For many of us, our most profound learning occurs when we take on a new project, whether it's entering into a new relationship, buying a car, starting a new job, or renovating the bathroom. Come learn how teachers can capture the awesome learning potential of projects- both big and small.
Audience: Middle and High School Teachers
Interactive Level: Participants will work in small groups on a project.

Ann Robinson
Biography Build Differentiated Instruction! Let Us Count the Ways
A "great" biography leaves enduring understandings in the minds of talented learners. Developed specifically for elementary teachers, this session shares field-tested lessons and effective strategies using award-winning biographies to teach critical and creative thinking and to encourage affective development. Explore the teaching guides, Blueprints for Biography, designed for teachers to use with trade book biographies. Participants will delve into examples available at the Mahony Center for Gifted Education website and then springboard into imagining applications for their own classrooms in this interactive session. Whether jumpstarting learning, diving deeply into literature, or approaching key content topics across the curriculum, biography provides a fascinating entry point to learning.

Audience: Elementary teachers, specialist G/T teachers, Curriculum specialists
Interactive Level: Participants will be provided with background through a power point and a demonstration lesson, then work in dyads or small groups to review children's biographies and example activities.




Tuesday Ticketed Sessions 8:00 – 9:30 a.m.

Doris Fulwider *Session Full - No Seats Available*
Cultivating Curious Minds: It’s Time to Teach the Love of Math
It is customary to hold off introducing complex mathematical concepts to students until high school or college. Unfortunately, by this time, many students have given up on math, deciding it is too hard or simply not for them. On the other hand, young children are naturally curious and interested. They are eager to explore and understand. So, why wait? Complex mathematical concepts, such as prime numbers, parabolas, pi, and the Pythagorean theorem, contain ingredients easy enough for elementary students to explore, appreciate, and, most importantly, ENJOY! In this session, participants will learn how to adapt a variety of complex math concepts, making them accessible to younger children, through the lens of implementing the Indiana Process Standards for Mathematics. Activities will be interactive, and relevant resources will be shared. It is time for our youngest students (and their teachers) to FALL IN LOVE with math!
Audience: Elementary – K-5
Interactive Level: Hands-On Projects


Isabelle Crowder and Elizabeth Connell-Lewis
We Know Science is Important, but How Can We Possibly Fit it into the Already Busy Day?
Science should be all about questioning and experimenting and thinking outside the box. We know that students learn best by doing and that creativity and innovation will be necessary in their future careers. With all that classroom teachers are charged to accomplish each day, however, it can be difficult to find adequate time to do science right. Participants in this session will discover creative strategies for integrating science in fun, meaningful and manageable ways in the elementary classroom.
Audience: Elementary and Middle Grades
Interactive Level: Attendees will participate in some small group activities and discussion


Margaret Easom Hines
Serving Underrepresented Populations: Programming Beyond Math and Language Arts
While Indiana schools are required to identify and serve in the domains of math and language arts, the state also recognizes additional domains of giftedness that schools may identify and provide services for as well. Creativity and leadership are two such domains that students who may not qualify for math and language arts high ability programming may demonstrate aptitude; opportunity to develop these talents will strengthen their achievement and allow them to shine. In this session participants will learn how to develop the creative and leadership potentialities of all students, in particular disadvantaged students, by exploring programs, curricular opportunities, and learning environments designed to develop talent in these areas.
Audience: All levels
Interactive Level: lecture, sharing, application of content through discussion


Penny Kolloff
Book, Line and Sinker: Luring Readers to Challenging Literature
The standards movement has prompted teachers to look for ways to increase the challenge of text materials. Many often-taught titles lack a sufficient level of difficulty, while more demanding works may encounter resistance from readers and, perhaps from educators. The presenter will offer suggestions and examples of ways to create interest and build readiness that will prepare elementary and middle level learners for more rigorous and complex reading.
Audience: Teachers, Coordinators, Administrators, K-8
Interactive Level: Presentation and conversation

Tracy Inman
Getting It Right with Bloom’s Taxonomy
All preservice teachers learn Bloom’s Taxonomy in their undergraduate education classes. Most teachers use Bloom in their questioning and in learning experiences as they differentiate for diverse learners. Unfortunately, many well-meaning educators misuse it – they think they are providing challenge and using it to differentiate, when, in reality, they aren’t. This workshop will show how to use Bloom in a variety of ways to differentiate effectively and provide appropriate challenge for all students, including those with gifts and talents. Participants will leave with a variety of lessons.
Audience: All educators and administrators
Interactive Level: Attendees participate in multiple active learning experiences including carousel, think-pair-share, small group tasks, etc.

Shelagh Gallagher
High or Low, Where Do Your Questions Go? Improving Classroom Questioning through Self-Assessment
Asking higher order questions is essential to cultivating students' higher order thinking. Understanding the types of questions that lend to good thinking, and questioning habits that facilitate and inhibit good thinking, is essential to effective teaching. This presentation will feature two classic studies on questioning in classrooms with gifted students that reveal patterns in teacher questioning style, and will then turn to pragmatic, hands-on strategies for teachers to use on their own, in peer coaching teams, or with an instructional leader to better understand their own questioning habits. Great for teachers of the gifted and for National Board candidates!
Audience: Grade 1-3 teachers, administrators, coordinators
Interactive Level: Audience will engage in a simulation, discuss, respond to questions, and analyze activities

Virginia Burney, Kristie Speirs Neumeister, and Lisa Novotney
Indiana High Ability Language Arts Units 6-10 (Phase II)
The Indiana High Ability Language Arts Units, Phase II, developed by the Indiana Department of Education provide new model units to help educators successfully implement the ELA standards for high ability learners. If you’re looking for a new IHALA unit to use in your classroom, or just want to hear more about these free resources, this session is for you. An overview of the unit project and the new models and strategies included in them will kick off the workshop. Then, participants will meet with the grade level author for a closer look at the unit concept, its readings, and the resources that are included in the lessons. You must specify a grade level upon registration.
Audience: Teachers, coordinators, administrators Grades 6-10
Interactive Level: Presentation and discussion/participation


Zachary Herrmann
Rich Mathematical Tasks
Not all tasks are created equal. Come explore (and experience) what makes some tasks more likely to elicit the kind of learning experiences our students deserve.
Audience: Middle and High School Teachers
Interactive Level: Participants will work in small groups on math tasks.

Ann Robinson
STEAMing A Head: Powerful Portraits Enrich Differentiated Instruction
Self-portraits are not only the art world's original selfies, but are meaningful resources for enriching STEM lessons. In this session, the presenters share exciting ways portraiture launches learning by stimulating minds and igniting imaginations. Demonstrations share how portrait analysis adds creativity and thoughtful flourishes to inquiry-based learning. Participants will gaze into the face of youthful Beatrix Potter, act like "Uncle Andy" Warhol, construct like "Sandy" Alexander Calder, and pose like a Picasso while learning how portraiture dramatically enhances STEM lessons. The presenter incorporates leading-edge strategies for portrait analysis and related language arts lessons for STEAMing up the room.
Audience: Elementary/Middle School teachers, G/T teachers
Interactive Level: Demonstration lessons, out-of-seat participation